Unveiling the Historical Beginnings of Rose Gold Metal in Jewelry

Rose Gold Metal

Are you celebrating the onset of summer and the glow of warm sunshine? This season, there is no better way to complement the bright colors than with mellow blushes, florals, and rose gold! A color that has boosted the sales of iPhones, Michael Kors watches, and even Birkenstock’s iconic Arizona sandals! Adding to the list , rose gold is one of the most popular metals for wedding bands and fine jewelry too. The pink color of the gold and copper alloy is thought to bring out the delicate rose tones of one’s skin and can be the perfect accent to your tan glow.  With its refined aesthetic and sleek, modern hue, Rose gold has come a long way. Keep reading to find out about its glorious history, along with pointers that will help you find the right rose gold jewelry.

Rose Gold Metal
Rose Gold Jewelry

Where Did Rose Gold Originate?

By definition, rose gold is an alloy of yellow gold and copper, with yellow gold being the predominant component. Carl Fabergé, the famed Czarist jeweler (US English), was among the first to utilize this priceless metal in his most intricate creations, including the iconic Fabergé Eggs. Combining yellow gold with copper resulted in an appealing pink alloy that was originally referred to as “Russian Gold” in the nineteenth century. This was subsequently redubbed “Rose Gold” for its beautiful shade, and the metal was introduced on the world stage, kindling its popularity in Europe.

Rose Gold
Rose Gold

Rose Gold In the The Victorian Era:

Rose gold was a popular metal during the Victorian era, often combined with blue sapphires found in British-ruled India. These magnificent stones made their way to London, where expert jewelers typically set them in rose gold mountings. Their color, a rich azure blue with twilight fire, was a perfect complement to rose gold.

Victorian rose gold was extremely popular due to its unrivaled warmth and ability to complement any skin tone. Winding vines of polished, milgrain-accented 14K rose gold, twist their way up the cathedral-style shank, intricately sculpted to perfection. In some cases, Marquis-shaped diamond buds are stationed throughout, emphasizing the floral motifs. These tasteful rings should be your go-to option if Victorian-inspired styles are up your alley.

Rose Gold
Rose Gold
Rose Gold

The Roaring 1920s And Rose Gold Jewelry:

The fashion-conscious women of this decade, keen on having fun and defying social norms, dressed in lavishly exquisite jewelry and were therefore inspired by vibrant colors. The era’s jewelers produced very inventive designs that favored the use of rose gold to lend warmth and softness to jewels. We cannot use another jeweler’s name

With this magnificently concealed halo engagement ring (on the right), you can show your loved one the true meaning of romance. The 0.26ct diamonds carefully set on the hidden halo and gently tapering band exude refinement. The 14K rose gold setting will highlight your 1ct oval cut center stone or perhaps even the Vintage-Inspired Engagement Ring in 14K Rose Gold with Round Diamonds (on the left). A difficult choice indeed!

Rose Gold
Rose Gold

How The Wall Street Crash Affected Rose Gold?

The 1929 Wall Street Crash had a significant influence on the worldwide business landscape. The luxury of the twenties abruptly became a thing of the past. This rapid shift influenced the same dynamisms, guiding the designs of the next decade. Art Nouveau arose from Art Deco, and jewelry was heavily influenced by homogenous and minimalist themes, with platinum being especially popular.

Rose gold adopted a new look, moving towards a peachy, fiery tone that contrasted spectacularly with white and yellow gold. The same theory was used for the gems used in rose gold jewelry. Brilliant red rubies, rather than sapphires, had become a preferred choice for rose gold rings. Some of these chic styles include:

Rose Gold
Rose Gold

Post-War Rose Gold Resurgence

During the post-war fashion revival, new jewelry-making methods allowed goldsmiths to combine rose gold with white and yellow gold in the same piece of jewelry. Rose gold’s delicate beauty added a special sensitivity and warmth to bejeweled designs.

As World War II progressed, platinum was considered a strategic resource critical to war operations, prompting several governments to restrict – if not outright prohibit – its usage. Gold in both yellow and rose tones was popular once again, just like these beautiful pieces:

Rose Gold
Rose Gold
Rose Gold

Today’s warm rose gold colors continue to be adaptable and attractive, complementing a wide range of jewelry designs. Modern rose gold has a clean pink hue, with very few coppery tones. Modern Russian rose gold is the pinkest, with a bright tint that conveys freshness and vigor.

If contemporary rose gold hues are too pink for you, you might enjoy the more subtle, coppery tones of the Victorian and early 20th– century rose gold jewelry. Gabriel & Co’s broad selection of rose gold hues and designs will add that extra layer of brightness to your dream summer look.

28 Shares:
You May Also Like